PHOTO FLOOD SAINT LOUIS

A surge of images along the banks of the Big Muddy.


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Mini-Flood 28: The Darkness

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photograph by Jason Gray

Considered among the best haunted house attractions in the country, The Darkness has long been a fan favorite for Halloween revelers in St. Louis. This “three haunted houses all-in-one location” hit has been featured on the Travel Channel, A&E, The History Channel’s Modern Marvels, and in USA Today, Fangoria Magazine and more. In addition, on November 10, 2014, Scarefest (The Darkness’ parent company) announced that they have purchased the building next door, and plan to include a fourth attraction for 2015! PFSTL would love a sneak peek when that happens… just saying.

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photograph by Jocelyn Clemens

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Mini-Flood 27: Amanda and John’s Wedding

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photograph by Jeni Kulka

It has finally happened, two Photo Flooders have tied the knot, and what better way to celebrate this triumph than by inviting PFSTL to Flood it?! (this might seem inappropriate unless you know our soon-to-be Mrs. Joern)

Though they did not meet in Photo Flood Saint Louis, both John and Amanda have been longtime supporters of the group, and great friends to many members for much longer than that. What’s more, the duo know how to throw a funky bash, and this event was no less. Read along as we wish the happy couple well, show some pics, and experience a PFSTL first!

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photograph by Jason Gray

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Mini-Flood 26: The Trestle

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photograph by Michelle Williams

St. Louis has joined only two other cities worldwide (New York City and Paris) in converting an abandoned section of elevated railroad viaduct into an urban greenspace. The project is being overseen by the Great Rivers Greenway District, and will connect The Trestle with the larger “River Ring” when complete. The project is also designed to bridge communities bisected by the highway and other factors.

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photograph by Laura Hudson

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Photo Flood 27: DeBaliviere Place

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photograph by Mandi Gray

A curious neighborhood with examples of some of the largest private homes in the city rubbing elbows with some of the city’s tallest apartment buildings. DeBaliviere Place is an architectural gem for St. Louis, that provides easy accessibility to Forest Park, Washington University, plenty of dining, and good public transportation options. Its western border is even site to a stretch of the controversial, proposed “Loop Trolley”.

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photograph by Jason Gray

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Photo Flood 26: Tower Grove Park

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photograph by Jeni Kulka

Donated to the city in 1868, Tower Grove Park is one of St. Louis’ best-loved green spaces. Second in size only to Forest Park, TGP provides recreation for some of the city’s most active neighborhoods. Originally designed after Victorian examples in England, the park is laid out on an east/west axis, and features iconic structures and landscaping.

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photograph by Dan Henrichs Photography, St. Louis

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Mini-Flood 25: World Bird Sanctuary

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photograph by Theresa Harter

The World Bird Sanctuary is one of the most under-appreciated attractions near St. Louis. With a mission that includes preserving both birds and bird habitats, the Sanctuary spans 105 acres, near both Lone Elk Park and Castlewood State Park. Formed in 1977 as the Raptor Rehabilitation and Propagation Project, WBS now serves more than 200 animals with specially designed enclosures, an activity program, and even an animal hospital.

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photograph by Theresa Harter

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Photo Flood 25: St. Louis Hills

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photograph by Amanda Krebel

The St. Louis Hills neighborhood, one of the city’s youngest, is a beautiful residential neighborhood filled with homes and businesses reflecting both the Art Deco age of their origin and the neon-colored vibe of Old Route 66 (which passed through). Of all 79 neighborhoods in the city, this one is among the most intact and consistently occupied. So how does an entire neighborhood remain so desirable for over 80 years? On one side, the answer lays partially in the work that a devoted neighborhood association does to keep streets clean, parks serene and businesses open. On the other side, St. Louis Hills is an answer to the question, “What happened to places like The Ville and JeffVanderLou?” That said, there is very little not to like about this place, while strolling Francis Park on a warm summer afternoon with a Ted Drewes in hand.

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photograph by Jeni Kulka

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