PHOTO FLOOD SAINT LOUIS

A surge of images along the banks of the Big Muddy.


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Photo Flood 32: Forest Park Southeast

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photograph by Jeni Kulka

Forest Park Southeast is a play on identities. Once a rural respite for city dwellers, it is now firmly encompassed by urban core. Once disconnected from the commerce and transportation mechanisms of the area, it now features one of the fastest growing entertainment districts and includes two interstates and a railroad in its borders. What’s more, the neighborhood north of Manchester is wholly distinct in character from the neighborhood south of it. Nonetheless, FPSE offers one of the more distinctive collections of architecture on the city’s South Side (from turn of the 20th to turn of the 21st century buildings).

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photograph by Allen Casey

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Mini-Flood 30: Grand Center Arts Academy

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photograph by Amanda Krebel

Designed originally to house the Carter Carburetor company, a historic and beautiful structure along north Grand Avenue is now the location for the Grand Center Arts Academy. GCAA combines a rigorous academic approach with a focus on the arts (visual and performing).

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photograph by Michael Matney

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Photo Flood 31: Ferguson

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photograph by Jason Gray

Once thought to be merely a sleepy suburb of St. Louis, Ferguson is now ground zero for the most significant civil rights movement in a generation. The events which have transpired since the tragic shooting death here of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014 will continue to shape the landscape of racial politics for years to come.

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photograph by Diane Cannon Piwowarczyk

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Photo Flood 30: Hamilton Heights

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photograph by Diane Cannon Piwowarczyk

Hamilton Heights is a neighborhood of vast potential. In the 1940’s, this area experienced its “golden days”, when the turn of the 20th century homes possessed a not too tired character, celluloid beamed brightly in the local movie theaters, and streetcar lines serviced the main business corridors. Today, much of that original housing stock has deteriorated (about 45% of the existing homes were built before 1940 and another 45% after 1980), though what remains offers many possibilities.

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photograph by James Palmour

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Mini-Flood 29: Anheuser-Busch Brewery

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photograph by Anne Warfield

Since 1860, the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in Soulard has been a bastion of St. Louis’ business and manufacturing clout. Having previously earned the nickname of “World’s Largest Brewer” the local business was acquired by Belgian-Brazilian giant, InBev, in an aggressive acquisition completed in 2008. Even so, the Brewery continues to be a favorite attraction for residents and visitors alike (an attachment solidified by generations of the Busch family, passionate beer barons and city boosters).

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photograph by Jason Gray

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Photo Flood 29: Covenant Blu/Grand Center

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photograph by James Palmour

This neighborhood, a transition between St. Louis’ Downtown and the Central West End, is also an important gateway between north St. Louis and south St. Louis. What’s more, it is a transition between a vibrant past and a hopeful future. Covenant Blu/Grand Center was once one of the most important theater districts in the country, and even today, it bills itself as the “cultural soul” of the city (with 12,000 theater seats, 1,500 annual cultural events, 12 museums and galleries, and 1.5 million visitors each year).

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photograph by Dan Henrichs Photography, St. Louis

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Photo Flood 28: Carondelet

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photograph by Michelle Bates

This exciting neighborhood is one of St. Louis’ most history-laden. Originally a French settlement just seven miles south of St. Louis, Carondelet tied its early growth to the fortunes of the city just north of it, and was eventually swallowed by the larger municipality in 1870. Still, that is not to say that the town did not have a character all its own, which is evident in still surviving structures not seen anywhere else in St. Louis.

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photograph by Jason Gray

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